Sandra Duchiewicz

Practical approach to concept art for games

Speaker’s bio:

 

Concept artist, illustrator and game developer, living in London, UK. She found her passion in character concept art and creature design during first years of freelancing. Those early jobs allowed her to create portfolio that eventually got her into working at Creative Assembly on Total War franchise where she worked on 6 Total War titles – including her favourite: Total War: Warhammer trilogy which she supported as a lead concept artist. After 6 years, she decided to go back to freelance life to test her abilities in other sectors of CG – indie games industry, vfx, theater and motion picture. Most of the projects  she worked on recently are not announced yet! Client list includes: Axis Animation, Whatboy Games, Creative Assembly, Games Workshop, SEGA, Wacom, Celsys, Paizo, FFG, ImagineFX and more. Between projects she likes to mentor aspiring concept artists via gamedevmentors.com and gives guest talks and workshops at universities and art conferences.

 

Speech description:

 

Concept art became a huge and important part of creating any entertainment content – Which caused this field to become very saturated due to its popularity. However, many students still fail to understand the role of the concept art in the production pipeline, and that causes confusion of how to prepare “hirable” portfolio and what to expect from this job. It’s not only romanticised “worldbuilding” and “storytelling” as I’m sure many of you heard already. This job actually gets very technical! And experimental! And you are not making decisions yourself. There are other people with you on the ride. I will explain how exactly concept art is being used in the games production, will explain why “team player” mindset is crucial, why research is the only way of coming up with great design solutions and how to develop productive habits and routines that will make you faster 🙂 I will also tap into the differences of the approaches from project to project (even in the same studio) and from studio to studio, and from industry to industry, and compare working on well established IPs to working on completely new IPs.  Being able to adjust your work habits to the team as well as recognising when its time to move on will allow you to thrive as concept artists in this amazing industry.

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